Posts Tagged ‘smoking’

E-cigarettes, liquid nicotine and poisoning

Friday, March 28th, 2014

E-cigarettes from CDCMany things in this day and age have gone digital – even smoking. The latest trend is the fast-growing use of electronic cigarettes, or e-cigarettes. They look like regular cigarettes, but can be used more than once because they use rechargeable batteries. E-cigarettes have nicotine that comes as a liquid and can be refilled. Nicotine is a harmful drug that is found in cigarettes.

There’s been many reports of people, especially children, being poisoned from being in contact with liquid nicotine, either by accidentally drinking it or by spilling it and absorbing it through the skin. Liquid nicotine has powerful toxins and a small amount may be very harmful, even deadly. Liquid nicotine for e-cigarettes is sold in small vials that may be bright and colorful. Sometimes, liquid nicotine may have added flavors, like cherry or bubble gum. All of these things can make it appealing to children and may lead to accidental poisoning.

There isn’t enough research to know if e-cigarettes are safe. If you use e-cigarettes, be sure to keep them and any items used with e-cigarettes, like liquid nicotine, away from children. Store them in a secure place to keep everyone safe.

Congratulations CVS Caremark

Thursday, February 20th, 2014

stop smokingThe March of Dimes congratulates CVS Caremark for its historic decision to stop selling cigarettes and other tobacco products in its pharmacies and stores nationwide. By becoming the first U.S. pharmacy chain to stop selling tobacco, CVS Caremark has become a pioneer in improving the health of American women and children today and in the future. Tobacco is poisonous to women who smoke and to their unborn babies. Smoking during pregnancy contributes to miscarriage and premature birth, and we learned just last month from the U.S. Surgeon General that smoking is a proven cause of disfiguring oral clefts. We’re grateful to CVS Caremark for working to improve the health and the lives of mothers and babies.

Smoking causes birth defects

Tuesday, January 21st, 2014

stop-smokingTo dispel any uncertainty about the serious harm caused to babies and pregnant women by smoking, the first-ever comprehensive systematic review of all studies over the past 50 years has established clearly that maternal smoking causes a range of serious birth defects including heart defects, missing/deformed limbs, clubfoot, gastrointestinal disorders, and facial disorders (for example, of the eyes and cleft lip/palate).  

Smoking during pregnancy is also a risk factor for premature birth, says Dr. Michael Katz, senior Vice President for Research and Global Programs of the March of Dimes. He says the March of Dimes urges all women planning a pregnancy or who are pregnant to quit smoking now to reduce their chance of having a baby born prematurely or with a serious birth defect. Babies who survive being born prematurely and at low birthweight are at risk of other serious health problems, Dr. Katz notes, including lifelong disabilities such as cerebral palsy, intellectual disabilities and learning problems. Smoking also can make it harder to get pregnant, and increases the risk of stillbirth.

About 20 percent of women in the United States reported smoking in 2009. Around the world, about 250 million women use tobacco every day and this number is increasing rapidly, according to data presented at the 2009 14th World Conference on Tobacco or Health in Mumbai.

The new study, “Maternal smoking in pregnancy and birth defects: a systematic review based on 173,687 malformed cases and 11.7 million controls,” by a team led by Allan Hackshaw, Cancer Research UK & UCL Cancer Trials Centre, University College London, was published online January 17th in Human Reproduction Update from the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology.  

When women smoke during pregnancy, the unborn baby is exposed to dangerous chemicals like nicotine, carbon monoxide and tar, Dr. Katz says. These chemicals can deprive the baby of oxygen needed for healthy growth and development.

During pregnancy, smoking can cause problems for a woman’s own health, including:

  • Ectopic pregnancy

  • Vaginal bleeding

  • Placental abruption, in which the placenta peels away, partially or almost completely, from the uterine wall before delivery

  • Placenta previa, a low-lying placenta that covers part or all of the opening of the uterus

Smoking is also known to cause cancer, heart disease, stroke, gum disease and eye diseases that can lead to blindness. If you are pregnant or thinking about becoming pregnant, there has never been a better time to quit.

You can read the Surgeon General’s report: The Health Consequences of Smoking – 50 Years of Progress at this link.

Smoking – a risk for preterm birth

Thursday, December 5th, 2013

cigarette-buttsWe’ve all read the articles, seen the ads, maybe even known someone who has had lung cancer. But many pregnant women still smoke. Did you know that smoking nearly doubles a woman’s risk of having a premature baby? We need everyone’s efforts to help women quit.

Not only is smoking harmful to Mom, it’s also harmful to your baby during pregnancy. When you smoke during pregnancy, your baby is exposed to dangerous chemicals like nicotine, carbon monoxide and tar. These chemicals can lessen the amount of oxygen that your baby gets and oxygen is very important for helping your baby grow healthy. Smoking can also damage your baby’s lungs.

Babies born to women who smoke during pregnancy are more likely to be born prematurely, with birth defects such as cleft lip or palate, and at low birthweight. Babies born prematurely and at low birthweight are at risk of other serious health problems, including lifelong disabilities (such as cerebral palsy, intellectual disabilities and learning problems), and in some cases, death.

Secondhand and thirdhand smoke are proven to be bad for babies’ health. All the more reason for both Moms and Dads to try to quit. With counseling and social support, smoking cessation programs have yielded a significant reduction in preterm birth.

Know someone who is trying to quit? Lend ‘em a hand. Want help quitting? Try http://smokefree.gov/.

Reflections on Jacqueline Kennedy

Friday, November 22nd, 2013

With the awareness and news coverage this week of the Kennedy assassination, I fell to thinking about the strength of Jacqueline Kennedy.   Not only had she lost her husband but a few months before she had also lost her infant son as a result of premature birth.
 
Mrs. Kennedy had a history of difficult pregnancies.  She had a miscarriage in 1955, followed by a stillbirth in 1956.  While Caroline was full term, John Jr. was a preemie and of course, her final child, Patrick died after only living 40 hours from what we now call Respiratory Distress Syndrome.   Sadly, this occurred 27 years before the March of Dimes grantees helped develop surfactant therapy, which was introduced in 1990.

Mrs. Kennedy was a heavy smoker and smoked throughout her pregnancies.  This was before the US Surgeon General’s warning was known to the public. Although smoking was more common in those years, no one was aware of the repercussions of smoking during pregnancy. Today, it is still a risk factor for stillbirth, low birth weight babies and prematurity. The Great American Smokeout was yesterday; if you do smoke, please consider quitting.  Smokefree.gov has tips. 

I also want to highlight the possible effects of stress in pregnancy. There are several types of stress that can cause problems during pregnancy.  Negative life events, like death in the family, long-lasting stress such as depression and being the wife of the President, could have also played a role.
  
The loss of any child is difficult; I cannot image the pain she went through.  Premature birth can and does happen to any woman.

Smoking nearly doubles the threat of preterm birth

Tuesday, November 20th, 2012

stop-smokingSo why do women still smoke? Smoking at some point during pregnancy varies widely, from 10% in Canada to 23% in the U.S. and 30% in Spain, according to the March of Dimes 2012 Premature Birth Report Card. Those are huge numbers, which may reflect how hard it is to quit. And since smoking nearly doubles a woman’s risk of having a premature baby, we need everyone’s efforts to help women quit.

Not only is smoking harmful to Mom, it’s also harmful to your baby during pregnancy. When you smoke during pregnancy, your baby is exposed to dangerous chemicals like nicotine, carbon monoxide and tar. These chemicals can lessen the amount of oxygen that your baby gets and oxygen is very important for helping your baby grow healthy. Smoking can also damage your baby’s lungs.

Babies born to women who smoke during pregnancy are more likely to be born prematurely, with birth defects such as cleft lip or palate, and at low birthweight. Babies born prematurely and at low birthweight are at risk of other serious health problems, including lifelong disabilities (such as cerebral palsy, intellectual disabilities and learning problems), and in some cases, death.

Secondhand and thirdhand smoke are proven to be bad for babies’ health. All the more reason for both Moms and Dads to quit. With counseling and social support, smoking cessation programs have yielded a significant reduction in preterm birth.

Want help quitting? Try http://smokefree.gov/.

Ask 9 questions before pregnancy

Tuesday, June 19th, 2012

Nine months of a healthy pregnancy is the best gift you can give your future baby. There are things you can do before you get pregnant to help give your baby a better chance of a healthy and full-term birth. Talk to your health care provider before and during pregnancy about you and your partners’ health and any concerns you many have. This will help you have a healthy baby.

Before getting pregnant, ask your health provider these 9 questions.

What do I need to know about:
1. Diabetes, high blood pressure, infections or other health problems?
2. Medicines or home remedies?
3. Taking a multivitamin pill with folic acid in it each day?
4. Getting to a healthy weight before pregnancy?
5. Smoking, drinking alcohol and taking illegal drugs?
6. Unsafe chemicals or other things I should stay away from at home or at work?
7. Taking care of myself and lowering my stress?
8. How long to wait between pregnancies? (Ask your health care provider what’s best for you.)
9. My family history, including premature birth? Premature birth is when your baby is born too early, before 37 completed weeks of pregnancy.

Special thanks to the celebrities Thalia and Heather Headley for helping the March of Dimes tell women about these 9 important questions.

Secondhand smoke

Monday, January 2nd, 2012

stop smokingAbout 1 out of every 3 children lives in a home where someone smokes regularly. Children exposed to secondhand smoke are at increased risk of lots of problems like sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), ear infections, colds, pneumonia, bronchitis, severe asthma, headaches, sore throats, dizziness, nausea, lack of energy, and fussiness. And the younger the child, the greater the risk is.

Secondhand smoke is made up of two things:
• The smoke given off by the burning end of a cigarette, pipe or cigar
• The smoke exhaled by the smoker
Secondhand smoke is also called passive or involuntary smoking. It contains over 250 harmful chemicals; about 50 of these can cause cancer.

What you can do to protect your child from secondhand smoke:
• If you or someone in your house smokes, stop! Talk to your employer or health care provider; they can refer you to a low-cost program that will help you quit.
• Visit the Web site smokefree.gov for tips and tools to help you quit.
• If you smoke and plan to breastfeed your baby, stop smoking. Breastmilk from women who smoke contains chemicals that are dangerous to babies.
• Don’t let anyone smoke in your home or your car, especially when children are present.
• Remove ashtrays from your house. They can encourage people to light up.
• Store matches and lighters out of the reach of children.
• When choosing a baby-sitter or child care worker, be sure he or she does not smoke around your child.
• When you’re in public with your baby, ask others not to smoke around you and your child.
• Don’t go to restaurants that allow smoking.

For more information, read “How can secondhand smoke harm my child?” from the American Academy of Pediatrics.

Smoking causes serious birth defects

Tuesday, July 12th, 2011
smoking4To dispel any uncertainty about the serious harm caused by smoking to babies and pregnant women, the first-ever comprehensive systematic review of all studies over the past 50 years has established clearly that maternal smoking causes a range of serious birth defects including heart defects, missing/deformed limbs, clubfoot, gastrointestinal disorders, and facial disorders (for example, of the eyes and cleft lip/palate).
 
Smoking during pregnancy is also a risk factor for premature birth, says Dr. Michael Katz, senior Vice President for Research and Global Programs of the March of Dimes. He says the March of Dimes urges all women planning a pregnancy or who are pregnant to quit smoking now to reduce their chance of having a baby born prematurely or with a serious birth defect. Babies who survive being born prematurely and at low birthweight are at risk of other serious health problems, Dr. Katz notes, including lifelong disabilities such as cerebral palsy, intellectual disabilities and learning problems. Smoking also can make it harder to get pregnant, and increases the risk of stillbirth.

Around the world, about 250 million women use tobacco every day and this number is increasing rapidly, according to data presented at the 2009 14th World Conference on Tobacco or Health in Mumbai.

The new study, “Maternal smoking in pregnancy and birth defects: a systematic review based on 173,687 malformed cases and 11.7 million controls,” by a team led by Allan Hackshaw, Cancer Research UK & UCL Cancer Trials Centre, University College London, was published online today in Human Reproduction Update from the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology.

When women smoke during pregnancy, the unborn baby is exposed to dangerous chemicals like nicotine, carbon monoxide and tar, Dr. Katz says. These chemicals can deprive the baby of oxygen needed for healthy growth and development.

During pregnancy, smoking can cause problems for a woman’s own health, including: ectopic pregnancyvaginal bleeding; placental abruption, in which the placenta peels away, partially or almost completely, from the uterine wall before delivery; placenta previa, a low-lying placenta that covers part or all of the opening of the uterus. 

Smoking is also known to cause cancer, heart disease, stroke, gum disease and eye diseases that can lead to blindness.

Smoking and heart defects

Monday, April 25th, 2011

cigarette-buttsWe all know that smoking isn’t good for us, but it’s hard to quit. There is growing evidence linking mom’s cigarette smoking during the first trimester with the occurrence of some birth defects. In the past we learned that smoking during pregnancy may increase the risk of a developing baby having a cleft lip or palate. A new study finds it might also increase the risk of the baby having a heart defect.

When you smoke during pregnancy, your baby is exposed to dangerous chemicals like nicotine, carbon monoxide and tar. These chemicals can lessen the amount of oxygen that your baby gets. Oxygen is very important for helping your baby grow healthy. Smoking can also damage your baby’s lungs. 

The findings from a new study out of Baltimore are in line with findings from previous studies, including those from the National Birth Defects Prevention Study, suggesting that maternal cigarette smoking during the first trimester of pregnancy might be a modest risk factor for certain heart defects. 

Congenital heart defects are conditions present at birth that decrease the ability of the heart to work well, which can result in an increased likelihood of death or long-term disabilities. They affect nearly 40,000 infants in the United States every year.

We know quitting smoking can be hard, really hard, but it is one of the best ways a woman can protect herself and her baby’s health. Quitting smoking before getting pregnant is best. But for a woman who is already pregnant, quitting as early as possible can still help protect against some health problems for the baby, such as low birthweight. Whatever you can do to limit the amount of smoke you and you’re your baby are exposed to is fabulous.  Need help? Call this free number: 1-800-QUIT-NOW (1-800-784-8669).