Posts Tagged ‘neck’

TV and furniture tipovers: A hazard for baby

Friday, May 8th, 2009

big-screen-tvFurniture and TVs sometimes tip over and cause injuries. The number of these injuries is increasing. Our wonderful big-screen TVs that are so perfect for the Super Bowl are part of the problem. These are the findings of a new study published in the medical journal Clinical Pediatrics.

One out of four of these injuries occurs when children pull over or climb on furniture. For children under the age of 7, the main hazard is the television. Children may injure their heads or necks or break bones. Tthese injuries can be serious.

So what can we do?

  * Place the TV low to the ground and near the back of the stand.

  * Attach TVs and furniture to the wall with safety straps or brackets.

  * Buy furniture that has wide legs and a solid base.

  * Install drawer stops on chests that have drawers.

  * Place heavy items close to the floor on shelves.

  * Don’t put your child’s favorite toy or the remote control on top of furniture or the television. Small children love these items and will reach for them every time.

Do you know any tips that can help? Be safe, everybody.

Car injuries: Not just in traffic. Ouch!

Monday, April 6th, 2009

car-smWhen I think of an accident involving a car, I think of a crash of some kind. Someone changing lanes without looking, someone running a stop sign or red light. But other kinds of accidents can involve cars as well.

According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, over 800,000 people every year are injured in “non-moving” accidents involving vehicles.

The most common accidents occur when people are getting in or out of a vehicle. So as you corral yourself and your kids for a trip in the car, be cautious.

Also, to avoid injury, take care as you unload all those groceries, toys, baby bags, strollers, etc. A back, neck, shoulder or knee strain isn’t good for Mom or the family.

If you have little ones, read about car seat safety on the March of Dimes Web site. The American Academy of Family Physicians has tips on how to protect your back when lifting.