Posts Tagged ‘circumcision’

Changing your baby’s diapers

Monday, February 10th, 2014

Changing your baby’s diaper can be a tricky part of newborn care. But with practice, moms and dads can become pros in no time.

First, before opening that dirty diaper door, collect your supplies:
• A sturdy flat surface, like a changing table, bureau top, or even the bed
• A clean diaper
• Baby wipes or a soft washcloth moistened with warm water
• Diaper rash ointment

Here’s how to change your baby’s diaper:
1. Place your baby on a changing surface (never leave her unattended for even a second) and unfasten her diaper.

2. Hold your baby’s ankles with one hand. Lift her legs and bottom and remove her dirty diaper with your other hand.

3. If there’s a big mess, use the front, clean part of the diaper to wipe her bottom from front to back.

4. Use diaper wipes or plain water on a soft cloth to gently clean your baby’s genitals and bottom. Take extra care with creases and folds in your baby’s skin. For baby girls, always wipe from front to back to avoid infection.

5. Pat dry. Apply diaper rash ointment if your baby has a diaper rash. Don’t use talcum powder because it can irritate your baby’s lungs.

6. Slide a clean diaper under your baby. If you’re using a disposable diaper, be sure the sticky tabs to fasten the diaper are behind the baby.

7. Fasten the diaper on both sides of your baby. For a disposable diaper, press the sticky tabs to the front of the diaper.

8. Tuck the new diaper below your baby’s umbilical cord until it heals. Make sure the diaper doesn’t bunch up between her legs.

9. To prevent accidents, make sure there aren’t any diaper openings around her hips.

How do you diaper your baby boy after a circumcision?

The diapering steps above are good for all babies. But if your baby boy is circumcised:
• For the first few days, put a new bandage on the penis each time you change your baby’s diaper.
• Use petroleum jelly on the penis or on the part of the diaper or bandage that touches the penis. This helps prevent the diaper or bandage from sticking to or rubbing against the penis.

Care of the penis after circumcision

Tuesday, February 5th, 2013

Circumcision is a surgical procedure that removes foreskin from the penis. Circumcision is a personal choice, so it is important that health care providers inform parents of the health benefits and risks of male newborn circumcision in an unbiased and accurate manner. For more information about circumcision, click on this link to the American Academy of Pediatrics policy statement.

If you choose to have your son circumcised, follow these guidelines for care until your baby’s penis heals, usually in about seven to ten days:
• During bath time, wash the penis and diaper area with soap and warm water.
• For the first few days, put a new bandage on the penis each time you change your baby’s diaper and change the diaper often, fastening it loosely.
• Use petroleum jelly on the penis or on the part of the diaper or bandage that touches the penis. This helps prevent the diaper or bandage from sticking to or rubbing against the penis.

Call your baby’s doctor if normal flow of urine does not return within 12 hours after circumcision, there is persistent redness or bleeding around the tip of the penis, or there is nasty smelling drainage from the tip of the penis.

Should my son be circumcised?

Thursday, July 12th, 2012

As a parent of a baby boy, one of the things you have to decide is whether or not your son gets circumcised.

Circumcision is a surgical procedure that removes foreskin from the penis. Foreskin is the fold of skin that covers the tip of your son’s penis. Circumcision is not considered essential to a boy’s health. Circumcision is a personal choice.
 
The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP)  says that circumcision has possible medical benefits as well as risks.   AAP says there is not enough scientific evidence to recommend circumcision for all boys. AAP encourages parents to make their decision after talking about the procedure with their health care provider. In the U.S., roughly 55%-65% of all newborn boys are circumcised.
 
If you decide to have your son circumcised, the procedure usually is done in the first 48 hours after birth, before you leave the hospital. Some boys are circumcised in the first few days of life at home as part of religious or cultural traditions.

Premature babies (born before 37 completed weeks of pregnancy) and babies born with health problems should not be circumcised until their health is stable.

How do you care for your baby’s penis if he’s not circumcised? Wash your baby’s penis with soap and water. Don’t try to retract (pull back) the foreskin. A young baby’s foreskin may not retract completely. Over time it retracts on its own.

How do you care for your baby’s penis after a circumcision? Until your baby’s penis heals:
• During bath time, wash the penis and diaper area with soap and warm water.
• For the first few days, put a new bandage on the penis each time you change your baby’s diaper.
• Use petroleum jelly on the penis or on the part of the diaper or bandage that touches the penis. This helps prevent the diaper or bandage from sticking to or rubbing against the penis.

It’s best to start thinking about circumcision before your baby is born. Put your decision in your birth plan and share your plan with your provider.

UPDATE: August 27, 2012 The American Academy of Pediatrics released a policy statement regarding circumcision today. “Evaluation of current evidence indicates that the health benefits of newborn male circumcision outweigh the risks and that the procedure’s benefits justify access to this procedure for families who choose it. Specific benefits identified included prevention of urinary tract infections, penile cancer, and transmission of some sexually transmitted infections, including HIV. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists has endorsed this statement.”

To circumcise or not

Thursday, April 9th, 2009

If you’re pregnant and expecting a boy, you may be wondering whether or not you should circumcise your baby. This can be a tough decision and lots of parents are undecided. Some parents choose to do so for reasons of faith, others for reasons of culture, and some may choose not to circumcise their sons at all.

Recently, the USA Today reported on a study that found circumcision may have important health benefits for adult men. The researchers found that circumcision not only helps protect heterosexual men against HIV, it also lowers their chance of getting other sexually transmitted infections, such as human papillomavirus (HPV) and herpes. There have been other studies that found similar health benefits for men.

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) is currently reviewing this research and we’ll keep you posted on any new developments. In the meantime, talk with your partner about what you think is best for your son.

Vitamin K – an important shot

Friday, May 23rd, 2008

Did you know that for a few days after they are born, newborns lack the ability to make vitamin K, a substance needed for blood clotting?  (I certainly didn’t when my children were born.) That’s why they get a shot of it within the first hours after delivery.

Healthy bacteria in the intestines make vitamin K.  When a baby is born, his intestinal tract is sterile until normal, healthy bacteria have a chance to take up residence.  It takes a while for them to start producing, so receiving a shot of vitamin K immediately helps the blood to coagulate. This assists in protecting against possible abnormal bleeding in the body, including the brain.  Some parents want their baby to have very few injections and you should know that vitamin K can be delivered to an infant orally.  BUT this method takes multiple doses over the course of several weeks, is not always well absorbed and usually is not recommended by health care providers.  Strict adherence to the schedule of follow-up dosages is vital to ensuring complete vitamin K delivery.

For those of you who are having a boy and plan to have him circumcised, it is important that he receive the vitamin K shot while in the hospital.  Circumcision is a surgical procedure and you’ll want to make sure all blood clotting factors are in place before proceeding.