Video monitor recall

24
Apr
Posted by Ivette

Summer Infant® is expanding its video monitor recall to include nearly a million video baby monitors. The problem is that the rechargeable batteries in the handheld video monitor can overheat and break, putting consumers at risk for burns. The recall, first announced in 2011, now includes over 15 models:
• Baby Touch®
• Baby Touch® Plus
• Best View®
• Best View® Choice
• Complete Coverage®
• Dual Coverage™
• MultiView™
• Peek® Plus
• Private Label Baby Sight
• Safe Sight™
• Secure Sight®
• Sleek & Secure®
• Slim & Secure®
• Slim & Secure® Plus
• Slim & Secure® Plus Power Pack

The video baby monitors were sold online and in department stores and baby gear stores nationwide from 2010 through 2012.

If you have one of the recalled Summer Infant video baby monitors, remove the battery and contact Summer Infant for a replacement battery at (800) 426-8627 or visit the Summer Infant website. In the meantime, the monitor can still be used along with the A/C adapter power cord that plugs into a wall electrical outlet. For more information, visit the Consumer Products Safety Commission website.

There’s an app for that

23
Apr
Posted by Barbara

boy using computerThere has been a lot of response to my blog posts that focus on learning disabilities. It seems that lots of parents of preemies are struggling with how to help their child who is learning to read or write. I came across this list of apps, recommended by parents, that I thought I’d share. These apps help kids with Dyslexia and Dysgraphia in particular. Check it out at NCLD, and let me know if you can add any to the list.

Parents helping parents is key to helping our kids.

Note:  This post is part of the weekly series Delays and disabilities – how to get help for your child. It was started in January 2013 and appears every Wednesday. Go to News Moms Need and click on “Help for your child” on the Categories menu on the right side to view all of the blog posts to date (just keep scrolling down). We welcome your comments and input. If you have questions, please send them to AskUs@marchofdimes.com.

IVF, triplets and more

21
Apr
Posted by Lindsay

In this video, Dr. Siobhan Dolan talks with a woman about fertility treatment and how to lower one’s chances of getting pregnant with twins, triplets or more.

Egg safety

18
Apr
Posted by Barbara

egg huntEaster egg hunts are fun for kids of all ages. With a little caution, you can make sure your family stays safe from Salmonella and other food poisoning illnesses caused by eating contaminated eggs.  If you don’t celebrate Easter, this info on egg safety will still come in handy, especially with summer picnics around the corner.

According to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), an estimated 142,000 illnesses each year are caused by consuming eggs contaminated with Salmonella. The FDA has put regulations in place to help prevent contamination of eggs on the farm and during shipping and storage. But consumers play a key role in preventing illness associated with eggs. In fact, the most effective way to prevent egg-related illness is by knowing how to buy, store, handle and cook eggs — or foods that contain them — safely.

Follow these safe handling tips to help protect yourself and your family, courtesy of the FDA:

When buying eggs

•    Buy eggs only if sold from a refrigerator or refrigerated case.
•    Open the carton and make sure that the eggs are clean and the shells are not cracked.
•    Refrigerate promptly.

Store raw eggs in their original carton and use them within 3 weeks for best quality.

Rules for eating hard boiled eggs

•    Cooked eggs, including hard-boiled eggs, and egg-containing foods, should not sit out for more than 2 hours. Within 2 hours either reheat or refrigerate.
•    Use hard-cooked eggs (in the shell or peeled) within 1 week after cooking. Cooked eggs for a picnic should be packed in an insulated cooler with enough ice or frozen gel packs to keep them cold.
•    Don’t put the cooler in the trunk — carry it in the air-conditioned passenger compartment of the car.
•    If taking cooked eggs to work or school, pack them with a small frozen gel pack or a frozen juice box.

If you enjoy making egg salad, deviled eggs or other delicious egg dishes, here are more egg safety tips, for you.

A safe egg hunt

All these “rules” got your head spinning? For a worry-free egg hunt, either hide the eggs an hour or two before the hunt and put them in the refrigerator right after the hunt, or better yet, use plastic decorative eggs if you are going to keep them out overnight or after the hunt. You can keep the decorated hard-boiled eggs in the fridge until ready to eat or adorn your table.

Holidays :) or :(

16
Apr
Posted by Barbara

family eating mealFor parents of kids with special needs, just getting through a routine day is often very challenging. If you throw in changes to routine, you could really be asking for trouble. But, it is springtime, and that means certain holidays are here – Passover and Easter. Are you traveling to visit grandparents or hosting family at your home? Eating new or different foods? Have a surplus of candy and chocolate at your disposal that may have  behavioral or digestive effects on your child? Are there unrefrigerated boiled eggs lying around the house tempting hungry kids? What do these changes mean to your child and are you ready to handle them?

No two kids are alike. Some manage the changes well and even blossom with the unexpected shifts in routine. Other kids have the opposite reaction and find that all these changes in their typical day are stressful and anxiety provoking. If this is the case for your child, here are some tips from parents to help get you through your holidays:

• Have a calendar where you clearly indicate what changes are upcoming (dinner at Aunt Joan’s, going to Church or Temple, wearing the new dress, eating chocolates), etc.

• Plan ahead so that your child knows what is coming next, especially if you are in someone else’s home or in a different town or city.

• Set up a reward system for positive behavior (such as putting a sticker on a chart for desired behaviors (sitting still, listening, etc.).  Every gold star counts! Be sure to let your child know when he has done something good and when he has earned his “prize.” Lots of praise works wonders.

• Only take your child to places you know he can handle. Holidays are not the time to spring unexpected excursions on your child. If you really want to fit in new experiences, don’t cram in too many at once.

• Build in quiet time wherever you are. Take along your child’s comfort toys/items so that he can be soothed as well as possible when away from the comfort of his own home. Often bringing your child’s pillow along can also work wonders.

• Bring along favorite snacks and food. Sometimes just the change in diet will cause constipation and intestinal distress, which will then cause your child to not be at his best. If you can keep his diet somewhat consistent, you are doing everyone a favor.

Remember, when you are stressed or anxious, your child will feel it and react. Be aware of how you are feeling and try to take a moment to assess your situation. Ask yourself – is this the right thing to do for my child and our family?  Then, trust your gut and do what works well. Chances are the result will be a happier child, which always makes for a happier family and a happier holiday.

Got any tips you can share? We’d love to hear from you.

Note:  This post is part of the weekly series Delays and disabilities – how to get help for your child. It was started in January 2013 and appears every Wednesday. Go to News Moms Need and click on “Help for your child” on the Categories menu on the right side to view all of the blog posts to date (just keep scrolling down). We welcome your comments and input. If you have questions, please send them to AskUs@marchofdimes.com.

Time for sunshine and flowers… and bugs

15
Apr
Posted by Sara

flowersPesticides are chemicals used to kill or keep away insects and rodents. You can use some pesticides in your home. Others are for use only outside or on crops. With the warmer weather finally upon us, we get to enjoy flowers blooming, grass growing, and all those pests that also enjoy the springtime weather. So is it a good idea to use pesticides to get rid of these critters?

In her book, Healthy Mom, Healthy Baby, Dr. Siobhan Dolan states that “We don’t know for sure what effect pesticides have on an unborn baby. In some studies, high-level exposure appears to increase risk of miscarriage, premature birth, low birthweight, birth defects, and learning problems. Although pesticide use is regulated by the federal government, there is a lack of agreement over pesticides’ safety.”

If you are pregnant, it makes sense to avoid pesticides whenever possible.

If you need pest or rodent control in your home:
• Try to use traps, like mousetraps,  instead of pesticides. Be careful not to set traps in places where children can get to them. Stay away from rodents and have someone else empty the trap.
• Have someone else put the pesticide in your home. Ask them to follow the directions on the product label.
• Put food, dishes and utensils away before using the pesticide.
• If you need to use it, have someone open the windows to air out your home and wash off all surfaces where food is made after using the pesticide

If you use pesticides outside your home:
• Close all the windows and turn off the air conditioning. This helps keep pesticides in the air from coming into the home.
• Wear rubber gloves when gardening to avoid touching pesticides.
• And as tempting as it might be, try to avoid walking barefoot in the grass.

In certain areas, you may need to consider using an insect repellant. Insect repellants are products you put on your skin or clothes to help keep insects, like mosquitoes and ticks, away. This helps prevent insect bites.

Many insect repellants contain DEET (diethyltoluamide).  According to Dr. Dolan, “Recommendations from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control don’t tell pregnant women to avoid DEET. But it’s reasonable to stay away from it if you possibly can, unless you’re in a situation in which using it makes more sense than not using it. For example, if you’re camping in an area that’s crawling with ticks or buzzing with mosquitoes, applying insect repellent makes a lot of sense. In that situation, the risk of getting Lyme disease or West Nile virus, which can be harmful to you and your baby, outweighs any theoretical risk that might be posed by the insect repellent.”

You also can prevent bites by staying indoors in the early morning or late afternoon when mosquitoes are most likely to bite. Wearing long pants and long sleeves when going outdoors helps, too.

Latina health chat

14
Apr
Posted by Lindsay

Join us this Wednesday!

Be sure to use #WellnesWed to fully participate in the conversation.

WellnessWed Twitter Graphic

Could Aspirin help prevent preeclampsia in some women?

11
Apr
Posted by Ivette

Could Aspirin help prevent preeclampsia in some women? That’s what a panel of experts from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force is suggesting in this month’s Annals of Internal Medicine. The panel reviewed research and evidence and found that low doses of Aspirin may help prevent preeclampsia in women who are at risk of developing the condition.

Preeclampsia is condition that happens when a pregnant woman has both high blood pressure and protein in her urine. With early and regular prenatal care, most women with preeclampsia can have healthy babies, but it can cause severe problems for moms. Without treatment, preeclampsia can cause kidney, liver and brain damage. It also may affect how the blood clots and cause serious bleeding problems.

No one knows what causes preeclampsia. But some women may be more likely than others to have preeclampsia. Some risks include:
• Having your first baby
• Having preeclampsia in a previous pregnancy
• Having a family history of preeclampsia
• Being pregnant with multiples (twins, triplets or more)
• Being older than 35
• Being overweight or obese

If you’re pregnant and at risk for preeclampsia, talk to your health provider. While the research may be promising, more needs to be done. In the meantime, don’t take any medicine during pregnancy without checking with your health provider first. Learn more about preeclampsia.

IEP reviews in April

09
Apr
Posted by Barbara

meetingIf your child has a disability and has an IEP, you may already know that April is usually the month when mandatory yearly reviews and IEP updates happen.

An IEP is short for Individualized Education Program. It is both a process and a written educational plan for a child with a disability,  age 3 and older. It is a document that lists all of the educational services that your child will receive, if he qualifies. Here is a quick review and resources to help you with the process. (See prior posts, for info on IFSPs for babies and toddlers.)

The IEP is:

INDIVIDUALIZED – specific for your child’s needs. It is not one size fits all.

EDUCATIONAL – it should look at three main areas of your child’s life:  the general education curriculum, extracurricular activities and nonacademic activities.

A PROGRAM or PLAN – all of the services your child will receive are laid out and detailed in writing.

What’s in an IEP?

The IEP may include special education, related services and/or supplementary aids and services. The IEP is first based on your child’s “present levels” which is a snapshot of your child’s function. In other words…what he is able to do now as compared to his non-disabled peers. Then, based on his present levels and his delay or disability, the IEP sets measurable annual goals.

The IEP should specify:

• Who will provide the service (eg. the speech therapist, regular ed teacher, special ed teacher, reading specialist, physical therapist, etc.).

• What kind of service will be provided, such as curriculum modifications or adaptations, the types of related services or aids- (eg. specialized reading curriculum, speech therapy etc.).

• Where the service will be implemented (eg. the regular ed classroom, playground, counselor’s office, etc.).

• When parents will receive reports on how well your child is doing. By law, you need to receive progress reports at least as often as children without disabilities. Often a school system will send home the IEP progress reports with Report Cards.

• When the goal will be achieved (eg. by the end of the marking period or by the end of the year).

• How the goal will be measured and how you will know the goal has been achieved (eg. a benchmark, such as a test score that shows if the goal has been reached).

Remember, an IEP is a living document that can be changed or updated by the IEP team, of which parents are members! It must be reviewed by the IEP team at least once a year, but it can be reviewed and updated more often if necessary.

Need more help?

A great place to go to understand your options and how to prepare for IEP meetings is on NICHCY’s website. In particular, you can find guidance on how an IEP team can write IEP goals. Keep in mind that NICHCY’s site will only be up until September 2014. Fortunately, you can find help by visiting your state’s Parent Training and Information Center (PTI), which is an information resource for parents of children with disabilities. Every state has at least one PTI. Each one has a different name. For example, one of the PTIs in California is named Matrix Parent Network and Resource Center while the PTI in New Hampshire is called the Parent Information Center. Whatever the actual name, each is commonly known as a PTI.

Some states also have Community Parent Resource Centers (CPRCs). CPRCs do the same work as the PTIs, but they focus on reaching underserved parents of children with disabilities, such as those living in a specific area in the state, those with low income, or those with limited English skills. Locate your state’s Centers  and read more about how PTIs and CPACs can help you.

You can also find excellent guidance on how to write IEP goals at Wrightslaw.

Lastly, review previous News Moms Need blog posts to zero in on where you need a refresher. Here is a Table of Contents of many prior posts, including several on IEPs.

Bottom line

April not only brings showers for May flowers; it is the month when most school systems begin reviewing and tweaking IEPs. With the resources in this post, you will be prepared and ready to play an active role in the process.

Note:  This post is part of the weekly series Delays and disabilities – how to get help for your child. It was started in January 2013 and appears every Wednesday. Go to News Moms Need and click on “Help for your child” on the Categories menu on the right side to view all of the blog posts to date (just keep scrolling down). We welcome your comments and input. If you have questions, please send them to AskUs@marchofdimes.com.

Updated guidelines for water birth

07
Apr
Posted by Sara

Water birth is the process of giving birth in a tub of warm water.  A few weeks ago the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) and the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) released a joint committee opinion regarding laboring and delivering in water. In it they state that “Undergoing the early stages of labor in a birthing pool may offer some advantages to pregnant women. However, underwater delivery has no proven benefit to women or babies and may even pose a risk of serious health problems for the newborn.”

It is important to understand that the committee does make a distinction between laboring in water and delivering in water.  They acknowledge that there may be some benefits to being in the water during the early stages of labor. For women who have uncomplicated pregnancies, laboring in water may result in decreased pain, reduced use of anesthesia, and shorter labors. However there is no evidence that immersion in water during the first stage of labor otherwise improves perinatal outcomes. And being immersed in water during the first stage of labor should not prevent appropriate maternal and fetal monitoring.

However, the committee did express concerns about a woman actually delivering her baby in water. They found that “the safety and efficacy of immersion in water during the second stage of labor [delivery] have not been established, and immersion in water during the second stage of labor has not been associated with maternal or fetal benefit.”

After reviewing studies on water births they found a risk of severe complications in the newborn, including
•    maternal and neonatal infections, particularly with ruptured membranes;
•    difficulties in newborn temperature regulation;
•    umbilical cord rupture while the newborn infant is lifted or maneuvered through and from the underwater pool at delivery, which leads to serious hemorrhage and shock; and
•    respiratory distress that results from tub-water aspiration (drowning or near drowning).

While these complications of water birth may be rare, they are very serious. Until more thorough studies are done and the benefits of delivering in water to both mother and baby have been proven, both ACOG and AAP suggest that deliveries in water should be done in a research setting with mothers being fully informed about the potential risks and benefits.