Archive for the ‘Pregnancy’ Category

Egg safety

Friday, April 18th, 2014

egg huntEaster egg hunts are fun for kids of all ages. With a little caution, you can make sure your family stays safe from Salmonella and other food poisoning illnesses caused by eating contaminated eggs.  If you don’t celebrate Easter, this info on egg safety will still come in handy, especially with summer picnics around the corner.

According to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), an estimated 142,000 illnesses each year are caused by consuming eggs contaminated with Salmonella. The FDA has put regulations in place to help prevent contamination of eggs on the farm and during shipping and storage. But consumers play a key role in preventing illness associated with eggs. In fact, the most effective way to prevent egg-related illness is by knowing how to buy, store, handle and cook eggs — or foods that contain them — safely.

Follow these safe handling tips to help protect yourself and your family, courtesy of the FDA:

When buying eggs

•    Buy eggs only if sold from a refrigerator or refrigerated case.
•    Open the carton and make sure that the eggs are clean and the shells are not cracked.
•    Refrigerate promptly.

Store raw eggs in their original carton and use them within 3 weeks for best quality.

Rules for eating hard boiled eggs

•    Cooked eggs, including hard-boiled eggs, and egg-containing foods, should not sit out for more than 2 hours. Within 2 hours either reheat or refrigerate.
•    Use hard-cooked eggs (in the shell or peeled) within 1 week after cooking. Cooked eggs for a picnic should be packed in an insulated cooler with enough ice or frozen gel packs to keep them cold.
•    Don’t put the cooler in the trunk — carry it in the air-conditioned passenger compartment of the car.
•    If taking cooked eggs to work or school, pack them with a small frozen gel pack or a frozen juice box.

If you enjoy making egg salad, deviled eggs or other delicious egg dishes, here are more egg safety tips, for you.

A safe egg hunt

All these “rules” got your head spinning? For a worry-free egg hunt, either hide the eggs an hour or two before the hunt and put them in the refrigerator right after the hunt, or better yet, use plastic decorative eggs if you are going to keep them out overnight or after the hunt. You can keep the decorated hard-boiled eggs in the fridge until ready to eat or adorn your table.

Time for sunshine and flowers… and bugs

Tuesday, April 15th, 2014

flowersPesticides are chemicals used to kill or keep away insects and rodents. You can use some pesticides in your home. Others are for use only outside or on crops. With the warmer weather finally upon us, we get to enjoy flowers blooming, grass growing, and all those pests that also enjoy the springtime weather. So is it a good idea to use pesticides to get rid of these critters?

In her book, Healthy Mom, Healthy Baby, Dr. Siobhan Dolan states that “We don’t know for sure what effect pesticides have on an unborn baby. In some studies, high-level exposure appears to increase risk of miscarriage, premature birth, low birthweight, birth defects, and learning problems. Although pesticide use is regulated by the federal government, there is a lack of agreement over pesticides’ safety.”

If you are pregnant, it makes sense to avoid pesticides whenever possible.

If you need pest or rodent control in your home:
• Try to use traps, like mousetraps,  instead of pesticides. Be careful not to set traps in places where children can get to them. Stay away from rodents and have someone else empty the trap.
• Have someone else put the pesticide in your home. Ask them to follow the directions on the product label.
• Put food, dishes and utensils away before using the pesticide.
• If you need to use it, have someone open the windows to air out your home and wash off all surfaces where food is made after using the pesticide

If you use pesticides outside your home:
• Close all the windows and turn off the air conditioning. This helps keep pesticides in the air from coming into the home.
• Wear rubber gloves when gardening to avoid touching pesticides.
• And as tempting as it might be, try to avoid walking barefoot in the grass.

In certain areas, you may need to consider using an insect repellant. Insect repellants are products you put on your skin or clothes to help keep insects, like mosquitoes and ticks, away. This helps prevent insect bites.

Many insect repellants contain DEET (diethyltoluamide).  According to Dr. Dolan, “Recommendations from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control don’t tell pregnant women to avoid DEET. But it’s reasonable to stay away from it if you possibly can, unless you’re in a situation in which using it makes more sense than not using it. For example, if you’re camping in an area that’s crawling with ticks or buzzing with mosquitoes, applying insect repellent makes a lot of sense. In that situation, the risk of getting Lyme disease or West Nile virus, which can be harmful to you and your baby, outweighs any theoretical risk that might be posed by the insect repellent.”

You also can prevent bites by staying indoors in the early morning or late afternoon when mosquitoes are most likely to bite. Wearing long pants and long sleeves when going outdoors helps, too.

Latina health chat

Monday, April 14th, 2014

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Be sure to use #WellnesWed to fully participate in the conversation.

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Could Aspirin help prevent preeclampsia in some women?

Friday, April 11th, 2014

Could Aspirin help prevent preeclampsia in some women? That’s what a panel of experts from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force is suggesting in this month’s Annals of Internal Medicine. The panel reviewed research and evidence and found that low doses of Aspirin may help prevent preeclampsia in women who are at risk of developing the condition.

Preeclampsia is condition that happens when a pregnant woman has both high blood pressure and protein in her urine. With early and regular prenatal care, most women with preeclampsia can have healthy babies, but it can cause severe problems for moms. Without treatment, preeclampsia can cause kidney, liver and brain damage. It also may affect how the blood clots and cause serious bleeding problems.

No one knows what causes preeclampsia. But some women may be more likely than others to have preeclampsia. Some risks include:
• Having your first baby
• Having preeclampsia in a previous pregnancy
• Having a family history of preeclampsia
• Being pregnant with multiples (twins, triplets or more)
• Being older than 35
• Being overweight or obese

If you’re pregnant and at risk for preeclampsia, talk to your health provider. While the research may be promising, more needs to be done. In the meantime, don’t take any medicine during pregnancy without checking with your health provider first. Learn more about preeclampsia.

Updated guidelines for water birth

Monday, April 7th, 2014

Water birth is the process of giving birth in a tub of warm water.  A few weeks ago the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) and the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) released a joint committee opinion regarding laboring and delivering in water. In it they state that “Undergoing the early stages of labor in a birthing pool may offer some advantages to pregnant women. However, underwater delivery has no proven benefit to women or babies and may even pose a risk of serious health problems for the newborn.”

It is important to understand that the committee does make a distinction between laboring in water and delivering in water.  They acknowledge that there may be some benefits to being in the water during the early stages of labor. For women who have uncomplicated pregnancies, laboring in water may result in decreased pain, reduced use of anesthesia, and shorter labors. However there is no evidence that immersion in water during the first stage of labor otherwise improves perinatal outcomes. And being immersed in water during the first stage of labor should not prevent appropriate maternal and fetal monitoring.

However, the committee did express concerns about a woman actually delivering her baby in water. They found that “the safety and efficacy of immersion in water during the second stage of labor [delivery] have not been established, and immersion in water during the second stage of labor has not been associated with maternal or fetal benefit.”

After reviewing studies on water births they found a risk of severe complications in the newborn, including
•    maternal and neonatal infections, particularly with ruptured membranes;
•    difficulties in newborn temperature regulation;
•    umbilical cord rupture while the newborn infant is lifted or maneuvered through and from the underwater pool at delivery, which leads to serious hemorrhage and shock; and
•    respiratory distress that results from tub-water aspiration (drowning or near drowning).

While these complications of water birth may be rare, they are very serious. Until more thorough studies are done and the benefits of delivering in water to both mother and baby have been proven, both ACOG and AAP suggest that deliveries in water should be done in a research setting with mothers being fully informed about the potential risks and benefits.

C-sections, scheduling births and why healthy babies are worth the wait

Friday, April 4th, 2014

We’ve written a lot of posts about labor and, that if your pregnancy is healthy, it’s best to wait for labor to begin on its own. We’re glad that more moms know that having a healthy baby is worth the wait. But sometimes, it doesn’t hurt to have a reminder – not just for moms-to-be, but for everyone.

Both of my babies were late, especially my son. (He’s a true mama’s boy and I sometimes get the feeling that he would climb back in if he could!) I remember all of the frustration and discomfort I felt as I reached and went past my due date. But as uncomfortable as those last weeks were, it was a small sacrifice to make for my baby’s health.

If there are no medical reasons for either you or your baby to have a c-section or schedule your baby’s birth, then it’s best to wait for labor to begin on its own. And unless you have a medical reason for having a c-section, it’s best to have your baby through vaginal birth.

A c-section is major surgery that takes longer to recover from than a vaginal birth. And you’re more likely to have complications from a c-section than from a vaginal birth. A c-section can cause problems for your baby, too. Babies born by c-section may have more breathing and other medical problems than babies born by vaginal birth.

All this is to say that if your pregnancy is healthy and you’re thinking about scheduling your baby’s birth, consider the risks. And even though those last weeks can be very uncomfortable, your baby’s health is worth the wait.

Heartburn during pregnancy

Friday, March 21st, 2014

unhappy pregnant womanMany women have heartburn for the first time during pregnancy, particularly during the second and third trimesters. For some women, it just occurs every so often. But for others, it can be a relentless annoyance that gets worse as the pregnancy progresses.

Heartburn occurs when stomach acid is pushed up into the esophagus, the tube that carries food from your throat to your stomach. Pregnancy hormones can relax the flap that separates your esophagus from your stomach and this can allow acids and food to move back up into your esophagus. This creates the burning sensation known as heartburn.

Pregnancy hormones also slow down the muscles that push food from your esophagus into your stomach and the muscles that contract to digest food in your stomach. This means that digestion actually takes longer during pregnancy. These changes can lead to indigestion, which can make you feel very full, bloated or gassy.

As your pregnancy progresses, your growing baby can also put pressure on your stomach and contribute to reflux. This is why many women experience more heartburn during the second and third trimesters.

Several things can cause heartburn and indigestion, such as:

• Greasy or fatty foods

• Chocolate, coffee and other drinks containing caffeine

• Onions, garlic or spicy foods

• Certain medications

• Eating a very large meal

• Eating too quickly

• Lying down after eating

There are a few things that you can do during pregnancy to try to help prevent heartburn:

Graze. Eating five or six small meals a day can help your body digest food better.

Grab a spoon. A few bites of plain, nonfat yogurt can sometimes help relieve the burning sensation.

Eat smart. Avoid spicy, greasy or fatty foods, chocolate and caffeine that can trigger heartburn

Loosen up. Wear loose clothing. Clothes that are tight can increase the pressure on your stomach.

Sit up after eating. Remaining upright allows gravity to help keep stomach contents out of your esophagus. If you can, wait at least 3 hours after a meal to lie down or go to bed.

Prop up your bed. Use pillows to prop up your mattress so that you raise your head a few inches higher than your stomach as you sleep.

Talk to your provider. If you need an antacid to relieve symptoms, talk to your health care provider to choose the right one for you. Over-the-counter antacids are usually considered safe during pregnancy, but do not take them unless you’ve talked to your doctor.

For most people, heartburn is temporary and mild. But severe heartburn can be the sign of a more serious problem. Talk to your health care provider if you have any of the following:

• Heartburn that returns as soon as your antacid wears off

• Heartburn that often wakes you up at night

• Difficulty swallowing

• Spitting up blood

• Black stools

• Weight loss

Join our chat on morning sickness

Tuesday, March 11th, 2014

Join us Thursday March 13th at 1 PM ET.

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Got the munchies?

Monday, March 3rd, 2014

sweet treatsYou’re pregnant and can’t stop nibbling. But that’s OK because you’re eating for two, right? No, not really. You only need 300 extra calories per day to support your baby’s growth and development. But you don’t have to give up all the foods you love when you’re pregnant. You just need to eat smart and make sure that most of your choices are healthy ones.   You may find that your interest in food changes, perhaps a lot, during pregnancy. The old joke about pickles and ice cream came about for a good reason. You may not be very hungry during the first months. But you may want to eat everything in the house during the later months! Every woman is different, so if you don’t crave anything, that’s OK, too.

Watch your portions—you may be eating more than you think – and if you’re a grazer who eats “just a little” but all day long, keep an eye on your end-of-day total consumption. Those little doses of calories can add up to a lot! It will help you if you avoid lots of sugar and fat in your diet, too, so nosh on berries or bananas instead of bread pudding or sticky buns.  fruit

The important thing is to eat healthy foods that you like, handle them safely, and avoid foods that might be harmful throughout your pregnancy.

Acetaminophen and pregnancy

Tuesday, February 25th, 2014

You may have heard about a recent study of pregnant women who used pain relievers with acetaminophen (like Tylenol®) and the risk of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in their children. Lots of women take acetaminophen during pregnancy to relieve pain.

Before you get alarmed, it’s important to note that the study researchers didn’t find that acetaminophen actually caused ADHD.  More research needs to be done to understand the issue. In the meantime, talk to your health care provider if you have any questions about using acetaminophen in pregnancy. And always check with your health care provider before taking any medicine while pregnant.